Renk fits out test centre in the USA

<b>The test facility at Clemson University will provide offshore turbine manufacturers with the opportunity to save both costs and time in the development of new systems.</b>
The test facility at Clemson University will provide offshore turbine manufacturers with the opportunity to save both costs and time in the development of new systems.

In the future, the university in Charleston wants to test power trains as well as complete nacelles with capacities of up to 15 MW and to simulate wind loads. Renk expects the test stands to be 35 m long and 11 m high. The university wants to offer all turbine manufacturers worldwide the chance to test their offshore systems using the new facility.
The first stand will be delivered in 2012 and the second in 2013. According to Renk, the order for turnkey equipment worth € 27 million is the largest single order to date in the history of the testing sector.

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