Van Oord contracts Damen for DP2 cable-laying vessel

Van Oord has ordered a new cable-laying vessel. The ship will be built at Damen Shipyards Galati in Romania and will be completed at the end of 2014. It is the first contract for the newly designed Damen Offshore Carrier 7500. The vessel is intended for the installation of electricity cables for offshore wind farms. Van Oord is making preparations for the Gemini offshore wind farm which will be constructed 60 km to the north of Schiermonnikoog, one of the Dutch Wadden Islands. The cable-laying vessel will be deployed at that site, among many others.

The vessel will be a multipurpose vessel with a length of 120 m, a beam of 28 m and a dynamic positioning system. It will be equipped with a cable carousel of more than 5,000 tonnes and a heavy crane that will enable it to lay heavy and long export cables. On board 90 people can be accommodated.

The cable-laying vessel forms part of the Van Oord strategy to offer a complete package for the construction of offshore wind farms as an EPC contractor. Furthermore, this contract endorses Van Oord’s drive to continuously serve new and existing markets by investing in new technology and marine ingenuity.

The new Van Oord cable layer is based on the Damen Offshore Carrier, a new multipurpose vessel design with a flush working deck, Heavy Lift or RoRo transport as well as offshore installation capabilities suitable for multiple markets. To this purpose, a large number of (offshore) installation equipment can be mounted on the vessel and the design can be adapted to create a dedicated ship, such as the vessel desired by Van Oord.

Katharina Garus

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